Start Something.

Start Something. I think this is an amazingly simple challenge that can have profound implications for our economy and society at a macro level and our overall wellbeing and outlook on so many things at a micro level.

Start something, anything really, as long as it something in which you can make money. You don’t have to go start the next multibillion dollar business empire, next Facebook, or even the next hot gaming app. Why? There are a few main reasons.

Start Something

  • Experience. The experience of accomplishment (or failure) that is yours. Working for others, for companies, will mean that your successes and failures are always on on other’s shoulders – your boss, your coworkers, your direct reports, and the company’s shareholders. When things go well, or poorly, generally, the accolades or blame get spread around, even if it was virtually all because of you or in spite of you. Even if it was your idea, your execution, and even your job on the line, with almost virtual certainty you relied in some way on company resources, capital, prior experience, connections, reputation, and personnel.
    It’s an indescribable feeling when you can look at something you made or a service you provided and know that someone paid their hard earned money for it.
  • Ownership. If I were to say “lemonade stand”, most of you would likely think of young kids selling lemonade in their front lawn. It’s a fantastic experience as a kid, mostly because it’s all profit for you, but to make something yourself, then watch as people give you money for your time, effort, and product.
    What I’m speaking of isn’t vastly different – maybe you have some artistic or crafty talent, you’re really good with computers, or perhaps could be a freelance personal trainer to help friends or family get in shape. Whatever your talents, use them, even if it’s selling hand made candles out of your house or apartment. The feeling of ownership is one our society is lacking on a growing level. Knowing that you can build something or offer your skills or talent is a powerful feeling, and one that you will never fully realize working for someone else.
    This doesn’t mean you have to quit your job and be a starving soap maker. I’m merely saying start something that is yours, even as an occasional activity at night or on the weekends, to really get that amazing feeling of ownership.
  • Opportunity. Do you notice how those that are successful just seem to have the right opportunities fall into their laps? I promise you, that isn’t true. They are out there working their tails off every day, whether it’s building a business as an employee, as a partner, as an owner, investing in others with their time and resources, or networking and proving their worth as a person with whom others would like to do business or just simply be around.
    You’ll be surprised at the opportunities that begin to present themselves when you begin to put yourself out there.
  • Understanding. There’s a great deal of hostility towards business owners these days. Walk a mile in their shoes, even in your own small way, and begin to understand things in a new light.
    Certainly negligent or malicious business owners deserve the scorn they receive, but the large majority of business owners are men and women who wanted to build something of their own, hire a few employees, and make their own way in the world.
    Daymond John recently said “Being a boss is this: Your employees don’t like you. Your family doesn’t think you’re doing enough at home. You share the success with everyone, and the failure is yours alone.” It’s no cakewalk, despite the widespread perception.
    Business owners are also the ones who create jobs – no one else.
  • Economy. That is a perfect segue. New businesses, new products, new services. These drive us forward. The beautiful thing about starting something is it’s not a zero sum game. Think about GoPro – they created an entire industry around high quality video cameras on the go out of virtually nothing and destroyed no other businesses in the process. This results in more jobs and new opportunities others had never imagined.
    We need people who are willing to take risks and grow this economy. Status quo is unacceptable.

Start something. Anything. Do it for the experience and fun at first, then grow. Get to a point where you are ready to start something great. Something that will have a real impact on the world. Don’t worry about changing the world with your first go – doing it at all is more than 99% of people. As you gain experience, aim higher than a flash in the pan or a quick buck. It will be so much more rewarding than all your past experiences combined.

Please don’t misconstrue this challenge. It is vitally important that people start and continue efforts to help those around them, their community, and those that deserve our assistance. Another disclaimer that must be said: anyone who starts something is likely going to rely on the help of partners, employees, investors, or family and friends at some point. That does not diminish the points made above, and if you are fortunate enough to start something and receive help from those around you, be sure to recognize it.

3 thoughts on “Start Something.

  1. Start something new.
    Just like that.
    What a concept.
    Simple and not obvious.
    Also
    Wondering what “deserving” is comprised of.
    And if it isn’t just as hard for non business people doing whatever non-monatizable work they start. And does worth and worthy have to be counted or recognized from the outside to be valuable.
    It seems to be a common tacit belief.
    What is your opinion?

    • Thanks for the feedback.

      As I mentioned in the post, there are plenty of necessary efforts that aren’t just about making money. That’s not what I am emphasizing here. I feel it’s important on many levels, as described, for people to experience starting something that earns them money. It doesn’t have to be the next global corporation – just something where people are willing to spend their hard earned dollars for what you produce.

      Helping people who “deserve” it is obviously a debatable topic – one perhaps I’ll touch on down the road in another post. Generally, I feel children, veterans, the disabled are examples of people who are unquestionably worthy of our assistance as a society. These are individuals who through no fault of their own may be in need of assistance.

      Best,

      Kevin

      • I love your insight and the simple idea, often to simple to be noticed, to make something.
        the ideas of “fault” and “worthy”, just aren’t quite simple enough.
        Wonder how those would be reduced to the same beautiful simplicity of: “just __________ something.” : )
        Love your ideas!

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