My First Fifty CrossFit Days…

… I’m never going back.

Friends had been telling me for years to do CrossFit. I’ve been a “GloboGym” guy since high school. I’ve always enjoyed weightlifting and hated cardio. I figured I knew what I was doing after more than a decade in the gym – why did I need to do CrossFit? Weightlifting defined a big part of who I was. I spent an hour or two five to six days a week every morning before dawn. I didn’t need someone to tell me how to work out. To be clear, I did more than crunches, curls, and bench press and even competed in an amateur bodybuilding competition in college. I also looked at the guys who were at the elite CrossFit level and thought to myself “There’s no way they do a five minute workout and achieve that level of fitness.” After staring, admittedly curiously, from the outside in, my friend and business partner Web Smith finally got me to give it a go.

There was no question I was going to CrossFit Dallas Central to give it a shot. Widely viewed as the best CrossFit box in Dallas (“box” = gym), I’d even heard it’s one of the best in the US.  One of my first reactions was a bit of sticker shock at the price. Gold’s Gym was $50 a month. I was looking at $200 a month to join CrossFit. I had enough people at this point in my life telling me I had to try it that it was more than worth a one month trial. Having started a clothing company last year, something else I’ve learned first hand is that quality is never cheap. It it’s a great product or service, it’s going to be worth the cost. Our “chasing cheap” culture has distorted reality to an unhealthy level with everyone expecting things to cost less than it takes to actually deliver that product or service. There exists an almost automatic assumption that there should always be a discount, and if it costs more than something in the same product category, it’s too expensive (even if they aren’t really comparable). Past the signup, I got my world rocked.

I can’t remember my first week of workouts in terms of specific movements/time, but I can remember being humbled as never before. There will always be someone faster or stronger (unless you are Rich Froning), so it wasn’t that someone finished something faster or with more weight… It was that I felt like the workout had obliterated me. No exaggeration. I remember collapsing on the floor thinking “But wait! I’m FIT!”. The important distinction with CrossFit is that you may be able to run a marathon, but you can’t lift much weight at all. You may be incredibly strong, but if you have to row a 1000 meters, you may actually pass out. CrossFit is all about exactly what their slogan says “Forging Real Fitness”.

Perhaps even more amazing than this realization that I was nowhere near as “fit” as I thought I was, was the bonding experience that took place almost instantly. From the coaches to those getting obliterated with me, the sense of community is phenomenal. Perhaps shared suffering (and of course triumph at the completion of each WOD) is a stronger bonding tool than I had ever realized.

This false sense from those who have not ever even tried CrossFit that it’s a bunch of workout lunatics/muscle heads couldn’t be further from the truth. I’ve seen the fittest people right next to those who are one hundred pounds overweight, all doing their best to improve their own fitness level while encouraging each other. From teenagers looking to get ready for soccer tryouts to men and women old enough to be grandparents, there is absolutely something for everyone. You do not need to get fit in order to show up on your first day. The coaches will tailor workouts to your level and push you, in a healthy way, for consistent improvement.

So about my “fitness” level… I rarely combined aerobic activity into workouts. I’d never done an overhead squat. I’d play with my phone or have long conversations with friends at the gym. I’d gotten really good at specific movements and while I was “strong”, I now understand I’ve just scratched the surface of true fitness.

Can’t wait for what’s next. Thanks Web and Lindsey Smith for opening my eyes. Thanks to the CrossFit community for welcoming me and making me want so much more for myself.

Start Something.

Start Something. I think this is an amazingly simple challenge that can have profound implications for our economy and society at a macro level and our overall wellbeing and outlook on so many things at a micro level.

Start something, anything really, as long as it something in which you can make money. You don’t have to go start the next multibillion dollar business empire, next Facebook, or even the next hot gaming app. Why? There are a few main reasons.

Start Something

  • Experience. The experience of accomplishment (or failure) that is yours. Working for others, for companies, will mean that your successes and failures are always on on other’s shoulders – your boss, your coworkers, your direct reports, and the company’s shareholders. When things go well, or poorly, generally, the accolades or blame get spread around, even if it was virtually all because of you or in spite of you. Even if it was your idea, your execution, and even your job on the line, with almost virtual certainty you relied in some way on company resources, capital, prior experience, connections, reputation, and personnel.
    It’s an indescribable feeling when you can look at something you made or a service you provided and know that someone paid their hard earned money for it.
  • Ownership. If I were to say “lemonade stand”, most of you would likely think of young kids selling lemonade in their front lawn. It’s a fantastic experience as a kid, mostly because it’s all profit for you, but to make something yourself, then watch as people give you money for your time, effort, and product.
    What I’m speaking of isn’t vastly different – maybe you have some artistic or crafty talent, you’re really good with computers, or perhaps could be a freelance personal trainer to help friends or family get in shape. Whatever your talents, use them, even if it’s selling hand made candles out of your house or apartment. The feeling of ownership is one our society is lacking on a growing level. Knowing that you can build something or offer your skills or talent is a powerful feeling, and one that you will never fully realize working for someone else.
    This doesn’t mean you have to quit your job and be a starving soap maker. I’m merely saying start something that is yours, even as an occasional activity at night or on the weekends, to really get that amazing feeling of ownership.
  • Opportunity. Do you notice how those that are successful just seem to have the right opportunities fall into their laps? I promise you, that isn’t true. They are out there working their tails off every day, whether it’s building a business as an employee, as a partner, as an owner, investing in others with their time and resources, or networking and proving their worth as a person with whom others would like to do business or just simply be around.
    You’ll be surprised at the opportunities that begin to present themselves when you begin to put yourself out there.
  • Understanding. There’s a great deal of hostility towards business owners these days. Walk a mile in their shoes, even in your own small way, and begin to understand things in a new light.
    Certainly negligent or malicious business owners deserve the scorn they receive, but the large majority of business owners are men and women who wanted to build something of their own, hire a few employees, and make their own way in the world.
    Daymond John recently said “Being a boss is this: Your employees don’t like you. Your family doesn’t think you’re doing enough at home. You share the success with everyone, and the failure is yours alone.” It’s no cakewalk, despite the widespread perception.
    Business owners are also the ones who create jobs – no one else.
  • Economy. That is a perfect segue. New businesses, new products, new services. These drive us forward. The beautiful thing about starting something is it’s not a zero sum game. Think about GoPro – they created an entire industry around high quality video cameras on the go out of virtually nothing and destroyed no other businesses in the process. This results in more jobs and new opportunities others had never imagined.
    We need people who are willing to take risks and grow this economy. Status quo is unacceptable.

Start something. Anything. Do it for the experience and fun at first, then grow. Get to a point where you are ready to start something great. Something that will have a real impact on the world. Don’t worry about changing the world with your first go – doing it at all is more than 99% of people. As you gain experience, aim higher than a flash in the pan or a quick buck. It will be so much more rewarding than all your past experiences combined.

Please don’t misconstrue this challenge. It is vitally important that people start and continue efforts to help those around them, their community, and those that deserve our assistance. Another disclaimer that must be said: anyone who starts something is likely going to rely on the help of partners, employees, investors, or family and friends at some point. That does not diminish the points made above, and if you are fortunate enough to start something and receive help from those around you, be sure to recognize it.

Jumping from Space

This is singlehandedly the most amazing picture of 2012.

Felix Baumgartner, an Austrian expert skydiver (coolest title ever), jumped from the edge of outer space yesterday, and became the first person to break the speed of sound unassisted by mechanical force. It was just Felix and gravity.  He jumped from 24 miles above the earth’s surface and ended up falling at over 800 mph. The Red Bull Stratos project inspired the world yesterday.

Surely such a feat of human engineering was directed by NASA or the federal government. The entire thing was brought to you by… an energy drink? In what has now set the bar for the greatest marketing effort in history, Red Bull shot for the stars with this one (bad pun intended) and funded the entire mission, from research and preparation, to execution and broadcast. To say it paid off is a massive understatement. Companies today pay millions of dollars to broadcast or print advertisements for a few seconds that most people ignore. Over 8 million people around the world directly participated in the event – and had to make an effort to do so – that had Red Bull logos everywhere and reinforced Red Bull is more than a company or product, it is a lifestyle that you want to be a part of.  For a company with the slogan “Red Bull gives you wings”, is there any better marketing stunt? Best of all, not one part of it felt forced.  It is a part of their DNA.  Can you imagine if Chevy did this? It wouldn’t feel authentic.

There are some great lessons that can be gleaned from this experience, for all companies, as Web Smith points out. While Red Bull spent a fortune on this, it was in such a pioneering way, the return on investment is far greater than an equal, or greater, sum spent elsewhere. They were also certain to prime the (worldwide) audience for a long time leading up to the event, ensuring maximum exposure. As tired of a cliche “think outside the box” is, imagine the conversation within the halls of Red Bull the day someone suggested having someone parachute from 24 miles above the earth to break the speed of sound unassisted. Most companies would have put that person in the “crazy” corner, or ignored him or her altogether.