Boston Globe and Snapchat

Two seemingly unrelated stories over the summer of 2013 should seriously wake you up.

At face value, it wouldn’t appear these events are connected but pause and think about them and realize the implications.

The Boston Globe was founded in 1872. It is the dominant newspaper in America’s oldest city with nearly 3x the circulation of its rival. There are apartments in Manhattan for more than the price Mr. Henry recently acquired The Globe for from the New York Times. Think about this – it was owned by the New York Times, arguably the single most well known newspaper company in the world, and it couldn’t survive. Oh, and they paid over a billion dollars for it in 1993.

snapchatThe Snapchat ghost is laughing at you.

Meanwhile, Snapchat started as a student project at Stanford at the end of 2011. Its creators, Spiegel and Murray, were basically dismissed by even fellow students for the notion of a social network based on impermanent pictures.

(Background on Snapchat: users take pictures that last for between one and ten seconds on the recipient’s phone).

The average user of Snapchat is 13 – 23 years old and the majority of “Snaps” are selfies, where the user takes a picture of him or herself. It’s no secret that a healthy percentage of “Snaps” are not safe for work, as a subtle description. Within one year, one billion photos had been shared with twenty million photos shared per day. While Snapchat doesn’t reveal its user base, its users are now sharing 200 million pictures a day. Until early 2013, Snapchat was still operating out of its founder’s father’s house and had less than ten employees, including the founders.

The amount of money Snapchat just raised is more than an almost 150 year old newspaper in one of America’s biggest cities with over 25 Pulitzer prizes just sold for. Let that sink in.

What are the implications?

  • Content: People demand content – and a lot of it. Some newspapers have done a great job of moving to mobile and creating a wider array of content (albeit a bit belatedly). There’s a time and a place for all content – even ephemeral and seemingly nonsensical. Certainly there is a difference between reading a random blog and the Wall Street Journal, but the “content kings” of the media no longer control all that is seen and heard.
  • Consumption: The ways in which people consume content will continue to evolve. It’s no longer enough to just have mobile and a Twitter/Facebook account if you want to connect with everyone. You can choose not to engage with new platforms (whether it’s Pinterest, Snapchat, or whatever’s next), but you may do so at your detriment.
  • Value: Gary Vaynerchuk wrote an amazing piece for Medium last week entitled “Value is Subjective. Even When It’s a Little Ghost.” His point was that you may think Snapchat is stupid (disclosure: I do), but there is a huge number of people who find value in it, so don’t write it off. You can examine it and choose to pursue other routes as the best way to move forward with your time, money, or business, but think back to how many people said Facebook and Twitter were stupid. Early adopters of these new technologies and networks, like Gary himself, have created enormous advantages for themselves.
  • Opportunity: Lastly, take heart in knowing that an idea dismissed by many at its inception is now worth almost a billion dollars (relevant context restated: Snapchat is now almost worth what the NYT paid for the Boston Globe in 1993). Get off your butt and go create something, anything. You have no excuse not to. While I don’t buy in to the inflated valuations of Instagram and Snapchat – and I recommend you not chase them or bank on them as your only option – shouldn’t it prove to you that an incredibly simple idea, even one that seems foolish, could be something huge?

On that final note, something to remember about the difference between an idea and execution.

strikingtruths_go-do-it

My First Fifty CrossFit Days…

… I’m never going back.

Friends had been telling me for years to do CrossFit. I’ve been a “GloboGym” guy since high school. I’ve always enjoyed weightlifting and hated cardio. I figured I knew what I was doing after more than a decade in the gym – why did I need to do CrossFit? Weightlifting defined a big part of who I was. I spent an hour or two five to six days a week every morning before dawn. I didn’t need someone to tell me how to work out. To be clear, I did more than crunches, curls, and bench press and even competed in an amateur bodybuilding competition in college. I also looked at the guys who were at the elite CrossFit level and thought to myself “There’s no way they do a five minute workout and achieve that level of fitness.” After staring, admittedly curiously, from the outside in, my friend and business partner Web Smith finally got me to give it a go.

There was no question I was going to CrossFit Dallas Central to give it a shot. Widely viewed as the best CrossFit box in Dallas (“box” = gym), I’d even heard it’s one of the best in the US.  One of my first reactions was a bit of sticker shock at the price. Gold’s Gym was $50 a month. I was looking at $200 a month to join CrossFit. I had enough people at this point in my life telling me I had to try it that it was more than worth a one month trial. Having started a clothing company last year, something else I’ve learned first hand is that quality is never cheap. It it’s a great product or service, it’s going to be worth the cost. Our “chasing cheap” culture has distorted reality to an unhealthy level with everyone expecting things to cost less than it takes to actually deliver that product or service. There exists an almost automatic assumption that there should always be a discount, and if it costs more than something in the same product category, it’s too expensive (even if they aren’t really comparable). Past the signup, I got my world rocked.

I can’t remember my first week of workouts in terms of specific movements/time, but I can remember being humbled as never before. There will always be someone faster or stronger (unless you are Rich Froning), so it wasn’t that someone finished something faster or with more weight… It was that I felt like the workout had obliterated me. No exaggeration. I remember collapsing on the floor thinking “But wait! I’m FIT!”. The important distinction with CrossFit is that you may be able to run a marathon, but you can’t lift much weight at all. You may be incredibly strong, but if you have to row a 1000 meters, you may actually pass out. CrossFit is all about exactly what their slogan says “Forging Real Fitness”.

Perhaps even more amazing than this realization that I was nowhere near as “fit” as I thought I was, was the bonding experience that took place almost instantly. From the coaches to those getting obliterated with me, the sense of community is phenomenal. Perhaps shared suffering (and of course triumph at the completion of each WOD) is a stronger bonding tool than I had ever realized.

This false sense from those who have not ever even tried CrossFit that it’s a bunch of workout lunatics/muscle heads couldn’t be further from the truth. I’ve seen the fittest people right next to those who are one hundred pounds overweight, all doing their best to improve their own fitness level while encouraging each other. From teenagers looking to get ready for soccer tryouts to men and women old enough to be grandparents, there is absolutely something for everyone. You do not need to get fit in order to show up on your first day. The coaches will tailor workouts to your level and push you, in a healthy way, for consistent improvement.

So about my “fitness” level… I rarely combined aerobic activity into workouts. I’d never done an overhead squat. I’d play with my phone or have long conversations with friends at the gym. I’d gotten really good at specific movements and while I was “strong”, I now understand I’ve just scratched the surface of true fitness.

Can’t wait for what’s next. Thanks Web and Lindsey Smith for opening my eyes. Thanks to the CrossFit community for welcoming me and making me want so much more for myself.

Was this in your business plan?

Progress

These two images were apparently both taken in St. Peter’s Square, one in 2005 when Cardinal Ratzinger became Pope Benedict XVI, and the other in 2013 when Cardinal Bergoglio became Pope Francis. Honestly, these pictures could have probably been the exact same in 2007 and 2012, meaning only a 5 year difference. Businesses frequently work on their 5 Year Plan, carefully charting out the future of their company’s efforts and finances.

So… was this in your business plan?

Look at how people receive information, share information, and process information today versus even a few years ago. The iPad will be 3 years old in April of this year. Let that sink in. Remember when everyone scoffed and said “It’s too big, too small, can’t make phone calls, and isn’t a computer.” How’s that working out for you?

Business planning is a necessary endeavor, on many levels, but it’s clear we see far too many businesses writing their plans out for the future and ensuring they do everything they can to stick to them, even following them right into bankruptcy. “But it’s the plan!” you can almost hear management cry out… Certainly companies (and people) should not chase every new opportunity just because it’s there (FOMO, or Fear of Missing Out, is equally detrimental as “sticking to the plan” in my opinion), but I watch many companies today completely ignoring the freight train of reality coming straight towards them. Kodak and Blockbuster (and perhaps Blackberry though there may still be a small chance for recovery/turnaround) are two great illustrations of the picture above being played out in reality and knocking these once dominant (even industry defining) companies out of existence.

And to the person in the foreground of this now widely circulated image, please do us all a favor, and stop taking pictures with your iPad. Thanks Tumblr.

*All image rights to their respective owners (Luca Bruno, Michael Sohn, AP, NBC). No copyright intended – this is just sharing*