The Entitled Generation… and Those That Will Work For It

While I’d prefer not to give this young woman any more attention, Suzy Lee Weiss wrote an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal this past weekend entitled To (All) The Colleges That Rejected Me with the byline “If only I had a Tiger Mom or started a fake charity”. I’m sure (and I hope) most of you are already disgusted with some saying “well, maybe it’s a bad title, and she has valid points” It is, and she doesn’t. It is a shocking confession of the most entitled generation in existence, demonstrating perfectly the “Participation Trophy” culture and should be a dramatic wake up call to parents, educators, politicians, and business leaders that years of failed policies, bad parenting, and excuses are coming home to roost. Some chastise the Wall Street Journal for posting such a ridiculous piece or childish whining, but I say kudos. I’m sure they said “People need to see this.” They most certainly do.

Some of Ms. Weiss’ embarrassing rant includes:

  • Colleges apparently told her to “just be herself” – which she feels is a lie. Newsflash: just being yourself is not a skill that will earn you admission to college and no admissions officers leave their advice at that. Don’t be fake, but impress them and show them why they want you.
  • She would have gotten in to her dream school(s) if she had just faked diversity by wearing a headdress or claiming 1/32nd something like Sen. Elizabeth Warren
  • Taking stock photos of “scooping up” a starving African child would surely have wooed admissions officers
  • If only she had a coffee pouring fake internship, she would have been deemed a top candidate
  • Her parents didn’t push her hard enough and make her do activities she hated, so now she’s an undesirable undergrad (Jeez Mom and Dad, you ruin EVERYTHING!)

Anyone with any sense sees right through this pathetic diatribe – except those that live this life. It’s clear Ms. Weiss has zero drive, no ambition to succeed, no will to challenge herself, and a humiliating lack of perspective made all the worse by a bit of investigation Caity Weaver at Gawker that shows her parents have a luxury home featured by the Wall Street Journal. Life has clearly been a struggle for this privileged middle to upper class suburban child. The rude awakening she feels she’s just experienced will pale in comparison to life outside the comfortable nest her family has provided.

This generation, spanning Generation Y to the Millennials, is in for a rude awakening across the board due to what they’ve been told by their families, teachers, politicians, and corporations promising them everything without ever really having to work for it. From participation trophies to classes without “F’s” because of how it makes students “feel”, many kids and young adults feel so dangerously entitled, it’s terrifying.

Which brings me to one of the best quotes I’ve read in a long time:

Hard Work

Nothing is guaranteed. No one owes you anything. There is no “safe” path. Life isn’t fair. The only way to give yourself the best shot at success – whatever that means for you – is to work harder than everyone else. Make your own luck. You’ll be surprised at opportunities that suddenly “appear” because of how hard you are working, how people treat you differently and want to help you on your way, and how success begets success. One thing I can promise anyone who feels how Ms. Weiss feels is that there are countless others around you willing to work so much harder, day in and day out. Those that will work for success will earn it. Those that feel entitled, never will.

I don’t need to add much commentary around the college admissions process, because that’s not really what this young woman was even talking about. This rant was a young person waking up to a reality she had been shielded from and her violent reaction to it. I guess it isn’t even a violent reaction though – it’s just about as much effort as she could muster, a 250 word gripe fest passively complaining about everything and everyone except her own lack of ambition and motivation. Note that 250 words is just about a quarter of a standard English class essay… You can almost hear her sigh with exhaustion at the end of it. Of course the colleges admissions process is flawed at some levels, but by and large, students demonstrating drive, ambition, and an interest in the world around them outside social media and reality television will stand out.

I hope her parents are as embarrassed as they should be. If they aren’t, the only hope Ms. Weiss has a reality check outside her parent’s Wall Street Journal Luxury Homes featured nest.

The implications for our society are real. An entitled generation unwilling to work hard and frustrated by other’s success around them does not bode well for anyone.

I do see some hope, though. Organizations like the Young Entrepreneur Council are growing quickly with young adults looking to make their mark on the world in business, philanthropy, education, and the arts. Organizations like KIPP are teaching teenagers about hard work and the need to educate yourself. More needs to be done though, particularly from parents.

Let’s hope parents, teachers, politicians, and corporations are leading young adults in the direction of the YEC rather than the line of thinking that leads to this the spiteful rant of an entitled teenager.

Start Something.

Start Something. I think this is an amazingly simple challenge that can have profound implications for our economy and society at a macro level and our overall wellbeing and outlook on so many things at a micro level.

Start something, anything really, as long as it something in which you can make money. You don’t have to go start the next multibillion dollar business empire, next Facebook, or even the next hot gaming app. Why? There are a few main reasons.

Start Something

  • Experience. The experience of accomplishment (or failure) that is yours. Working for others, for companies, will mean that your successes and failures are always on on other’s shoulders – your boss, your coworkers, your direct reports, and the company’s shareholders. When things go well, or poorly, generally, the accolades or blame get spread around, even if it was virtually all because of you or in spite of you. Even if it was your idea, your execution, and even your job on the line, with almost virtual certainty you relied in some way on company resources, capital, prior experience, connections, reputation, and personnel.
    It’s an indescribable feeling when you can look at something you made or a service you provided and know that someone paid their hard earned money for it.
  • Ownership. If I were to say “lemonade stand”, most of you would likely think of young kids selling lemonade in their front lawn. It’s a fantastic experience as a kid, mostly because it’s all profit for you, but to make something yourself, then watch as people give you money for your time, effort, and product.
    What I’m speaking of isn’t vastly different – maybe you have some artistic or crafty talent, you’re really good with computers, or perhaps could be a freelance personal trainer to help friends or family get in shape. Whatever your talents, use them, even if it’s selling hand made candles out of your house or apartment. The feeling of ownership is one our society is lacking on a growing level. Knowing that you can build something or offer your skills or talent is a powerful feeling, and one that you will never fully realize working for someone else.
    This doesn’t mean you have to quit your job and be a starving soap maker. I’m merely saying start something that is yours, even as an occasional activity at night or on the weekends, to really get that amazing feeling of ownership.
  • Opportunity. Do you notice how those that are successful just seem to have the right opportunities fall into their laps? I promise you, that isn’t true. They are out there working their tails off every day, whether it’s building a business as an employee, as a partner, as an owner, investing in others with their time and resources, or networking and proving their worth as a person with whom others would like to do business or just simply be around.
    You’ll be surprised at the opportunities that begin to present themselves when you begin to put yourself out there.
  • Understanding. There’s a great deal of hostility towards business owners these days. Walk a mile in their shoes, even in your own small way, and begin to understand things in a new light.
    Certainly negligent or malicious business owners deserve the scorn they receive, but the large majority of business owners are men and women who wanted to build something of their own, hire a few employees, and make their own way in the world.
    Daymond John recently said “Being a boss is this: Your employees don’t like you. Your family doesn’t think you’re doing enough at home. You share the success with everyone, and the failure is yours alone.” It’s no cakewalk, despite the widespread perception.
    Business owners are also the ones who create jobs – no one else.
  • Economy. That is a perfect segue. New businesses, new products, new services. These drive us forward. The beautiful thing about starting something is it’s not a zero sum game. Think about GoPro – they created an entire industry around high quality video cameras on the go out of virtually nothing and destroyed no other businesses in the process. This results in more jobs and new opportunities others had never imagined.
    We need people who are willing to take risks and grow this economy. Status quo is unacceptable.

Start something. Anything. Do it for the experience and fun at first, then grow. Get to a point where you are ready to start something great. Something that will have a real impact on the world. Don’t worry about changing the world with your first go – doing it at all is more than 99% of people. As you gain experience, aim higher than a flash in the pan or a quick buck. It will be so much more rewarding than all your past experiences combined.

Please don’t misconstrue this challenge. It is vitally important that people start and continue efforts to help those around them, their community, and those that deserve our assistance. Another disclaimer that must be said: anyone who starts something is likely going to rely on the help of partners, employees, investors, or family and friends at some point. That does not diminish the points made above, and if you are fortunate enough to start something and receive help from those around you, be sure to recognize it.

Was this in your business plan?

Progress

These two images were apparently both taken in St. Peter’s Square, one in 2005 when Cardinal Ratzinger became Pope Benedict XVI, and the other in 2013 when Cardinal Bergoglio became Pope Francis. Honestly, these pictures could have probably been the exact same in 2007 and 2012, meaning only a 5 year difference. Businesses frequently work on their 5 Year Plan, carefully charting out the future of their company’s efforts and finances.

So… was this in your business plan?

Look at how people receive information, share information, and process information today versus even a few years ago. The iPad will be 3 years old in April of this year. Let that sink in. Remember when everyone scoffed and said “It’s too big, too small, can’t make phone calls, and isn’t a computer.” How’s that working out for you?

Business planning is a necessary endeavor, on many levels, but it’s clear we see far too many businesses writing their plans out for the future and ensuring they do everything they can to stick to them, even following them right into bankruptcy. “But it’s the plan!” you can almost hear management cry out… Certainly companies (and people) should not chase every new opportunity just because it’s there (FOMO, or Fear of Missing Out, is equally detrimental as “sticking to the plan” in my opinion), but I watch many companies today completely ignoring the freight train of reality coming straight towards them. Kodak and Blockbuster (and perhaps Blackberry though there may still be a small chance for recovery/turnaround) are two great illustrations of the picture above being played out in reality and knocking these once dominant (even industry defining) companies out of existence.

And to the person in the foreground of this now widely circulated image, please do us all a favor, and stop taking pictures with your iPad. Thanks Tumblr.

*All image rights to their respective owners (Luca Bruno, Michael Sohn, AP, NBC). No copyright intended – this is just sharing*